Loved the book? See the movie!

Hey, NASHVILLE: James Dashner’s The Maze Runner is coming to the big screen Friday September 19, and we’ve got your chance to see it A DAY EARLY… for FREE! Click below to get your passes to an advance screening.

(First-come / first-served until tickets run out. Note: Tickets do not guarantee seating, so get there early!)


http://l.gofobo.us/h57gCsDR

Loved the book? See the movie!

Hey, NASHVILLE: James Dashner’s The Maze Runner is coming to the big screen Friday September 19, and we’ve got your chance to see it A DAY EARLY… for FREE! Click below to get your passes to an advance screening.

(First-come / first-served until tickets run out. Note: Tickets do not guarantee seating, so get there early!)

http://l.gofobo.us/h57gCsDR

Every year teachers let me know that the post below about my experience living in Manhattan a few dozen blocks from the World Trade Center on 9/11 has become part of their classroom curriculum, so I continue to post it annually.

I think it’s especially important to post this year given the fact that the other day I overheard some guy ask: “Why should we care if a few Westerners want to join ISIS? What’s the worst that could happen?”

I’d like to think this guy is just some random butthole, but given a new study I just read that only 54% of the world’s population has ever heard of the Holocaust, I think some people have forgotten about 9/11, or think it was only about “a few buildings” getting blown up, not thousands of normal every day people just like you and me dying in the most horrible ways imaginable simply because they did what most of us do every morning: They went to work.

And now, only 13 years later, another “radical terrorist group” has sprung up in the Middle East. Some Westerners think they aren’t “that much of a threat,” or even that their “cause” has merit. Um, what?

Look, I get it. 9/11 is depressing. This has been a bummer summer. We’d all rather read about the Royal Wedding of Princess Mia and Michael Moscovitz. But it won’t be available until 2015.

And a writer’s job isn’t only to entertain: It’s to record the tragedies of history so they won’t be forgotten and repeated, and also to point out acts of heroism so that they’ll inspire others to act similarly in future events. So read on. There’s tragedy in this, but there’s plenty of inspirational heroism, too, I promise.

"I am happy to guide anyone interested in increasing their own interpersonal sense of empathy back to the middle grade shelves for a discussion that includes such topics as why Hufflepuffs are actually pretty great, how implementing a Floo network could solve the energy crisis, and which American Founding Fathers may have actually been secret wizards (BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DUH)." - says Steph Appell, our Assistant Manager of Books for Young Readers

 

I loved movies so much as a kid because I moved cross country and I went through a hard time at school, having kids really make my life miserable for no reason. The one thing I would look forward to at the end of the day was going home to watch my TV shows. TV and movies would instill this happiness in me. So I totally get it. I was that kid too. I get genuinely touched by it sometimes because I can I now give that to kids, and that’s cool.